Tag Archives: Tarantino

Christoph Waltz’s German bounty hunter character came “boom!”, flying out of Tarantino’s pen!

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❝Oscar-winning filmmaker Quentin Tarantino says after working with Christoph Waltz on 2009’s “Inglourious Basterds,” he found himself writing a role specifically for the Austrian actor in “Django Unchained.”

“I’ve been wanting to do this story for a long time and there was never a German dentist-bounty hunter in the story. The next thing I know, I sat down and wrote that opening scene, and he just flew right out of the pen, like it was the tenant of God, boom!” Tarantino told reporters in New York while promoting “Django” before its theatrical release late last year.❞

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Christopher Nolan’s Following, from Film School Rejects’ “Year in Review: The Best of Criterion in 2012”

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☞ It’s the end of the year, and writers and periodicals produce lists of the best (or worst) films of the year. In Film School Rejects’ “Year in Review: The Best of Criterion in 2012,” the most narratively interesting brief review is of Christopher Nolan’s first feature film, Following.

“Earlier in his filmmaking career Christopher Nolan was drawing comparisons to Quentin Tarantino in his toying with writing structure by breaking up his linear story line into movable chunks that could be mixed and matched to move the story forward to a more entertaining effect than had the story been told in sequence. Also like Tarantino it was with his second feature film that Nolan would make his more prominent impact. While the two would separate themselves from comparison beyond that point their roots remain planted in similar soil.

In Following Nolan tells of a writer who chooses to stalk people to assist in getting material to write about. In doing so he meets a professional thief who gives our unsuspecting writer a tour in the life of a criminal. Like in his second feature, Memento, Nolan does a fine job of locating the climax in his story and ensuring that while the plot doesn’t follow a sequential timeline, the events that occur are told to us as they should be in order to accommodate a familiar, expected, and enjoyable rhythm. – Adam Charles

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